today I become a blogger

I just got back from my guitar lesson. Michele Castellani and I played picking exercises and he gave me some rhythmic figures to work with to improve my picking and my sense of timing. I started taking guitar lessons again after nearly 50 years because my playing had become sloppy and I had picked up some lazy habits. Plus, living in Italy, I want to engage with other musicians.

Before I got home, though, I tried to pick Norma up and got stuck at the end of a dead-end road and had to make a careful many-point turn with a ditch on one side and a wall on the other, and the wind has come up, the first sign of fall and winter, the first day in many months that it is chilly, and we have had a long day, finalizing our plans for the kitchen with our voluble and ingenious designer Alvaro Toresi, and our friends Todd Freeman and Connie Hendrix are here in Castiglion Fiorention with us, and we ate a long and delicious but somewhat exhausting lunch at Il Teatro in Cortona after meeting with Alvaro in Camucia and well into the lunch I felt I was maybe coming down with something and would not be able to make the writers group I usually go to up in Florence, and went home to take a nap.

All of which is neither here nor there, the inconsequential acts that precede a big decision, a big decision that sort of comes out of nowhere. I decided finally to start blogging about my life here. Mostly because I just want to.

I’ve been keeping a journal regularly since August. I always use the Mead 100-page composition book but lately I’ve been confiding in it daily, and it has led me to this point. I won’t bore you with my many reasons for disparaging such an activity as keeping a blog about my life in Italy. I’m just going to start posting things, some of which will be boring like this one, and others of which will go quite deeply and carefully into my writing life and my daily work to finish and publish book-length manuscripts.

People write blogs for themselves and for others. I guess that’s what this will be. It will be for me and also for you. And I won’t worry too much about whether it’s fascinating or not. Some days it will be boring, just like the writing I do in my journal. Other days I will spend a lot of time thinking through matters related to being a writer, etc.

OH: one more thing. This month makes five years since I lost my job at Salon.com writing the “Since You Asked” column. Less than two years after that job ended Norma and I decided to sell our San Francisco house and move to Castiglion Fiorentino, where we are living now. There will probably be lots more about that as well.

Sorry I don’t have a picture for this one. I’m lazy.

Cheers

CT

Three Quick Thoughts on Living in Tuscany

  1. No kidding, people are different here.
  2. Everything’s got a story and often it’s a long story.
  3. We’re glad we got out of San Francisco when we did but the real Tuscany is both much more amazing and much more about regular daily life than the brand “Tuscany”  co-opted by sellers of “Tuscan-brown sofas surrounded by Tuscan-yellow walls,” etcetera. That’s all. Just something I was thinking about. Keep in touch. Missing all our friends in the States.–Cary T.

    Hi there, I’m waving at you from the grounds of Iris Origo’s famous estate La Foce.